Category Archives: Blog

The Nuts and Bolts of Prosthetic Testicles

What is a prosthetic testicle?

This is an artificial (human-made) testicle that replaces one lost due to injury or medical condition, such as testicular cancer. It doesn’t perform any of the functions of a normal testicle in that it doesn’t produce sperm of testosterone.

Men born without a testicle may also request a prosthetic testicle, but this occurs much less often.

Other names for prosthetic testicles include:

  • fake testicles
  • testicle implants
  • testicle transplants
  • artificial testes

What are prosthetic testicles made of?

Most prosthetic testicles are made of silicone and filled with saline. In early times, materials such as vitallium (also used in dentistry) and even marble was used for prosthetic testicles!

What does an artificial testicle look like?

Testicular implants have the appearance of small, translucent and squishy looking eggs. They have a similar shape, weight and feel to a human testicle. They come in a range of different sizes, so a urologist can choose a size that is a good match for your body – and your other testicle.

Why choose to have a prosthetic testicle?

You don’t have to choose the option of a prosthetic testicle if you’re missing one. Most testicular cancer survivors who choose to have a prosthetic replacement following an orchidectomy (surgical removal of one or both testicles) do so for image reasons. It can improve physical appearance and confidence, and calm any psychological fears.

Having a testicle implant, or choosing not to, will not affect your ability to get an erection or have sex.

How do you replace a missing testicle?

In general, the surgical procedure will involve the following steps:

  1. You will be under either general or local anaesthesia. The former will put you to sleep for the whole procedure (most common – especially if you have testicular cancer and you are having a tumorous testicle removed). The latter involves numbing your scrotum and the surrounding areas, and you will be awake for the procedure.
  2. A scalpel is used to make an incision in the lower part of your abdomen/groin or the upper section of your scrotum.
  3. If you have testicular cancer then first the tumorous testicle must be removed through the incision made in the previous step.
  4. A pouch is created for the prosthetic testicle within your scrotum.
  5. The implant is sewn into place in the correct position in your scrotum.
  6. The incision is closed using stitches.

This is a relatively simple and typically outpatient procedure that can take less than an hour. You can go home as soon as the procedure is complete and you feel fine to do so.

Prosthetic testicle benefits

  • Prosthetic testicles can last a lifetime
  • Relatively safe procedure with low risk of surgical complications or side effects
  • Improves body image
  • Boosts confidence and self-esteem

Prosthetic testicle risks

  • Infection
  • Scarring
  • The prosthetic testicle may shift out of position, rupture or leak
  • Pooling of blood in your scrotum

It’s important to note that the chances of these risks coming into fruition are rare. However, if you have certain conditions or existing complications, you may have a higher risk of developing complications.

This can include diabetes or a suppressed immune system (increases risk of infection), previous surgery on your scrotum, or an existing infection anywhere in your body.

What is the recovery and aftercare process?

After surgery you can expect some amount of pain or discomfort. It will feel tender around your scrotum and the area around the scar for at least a couple of days. You will also need to wear bandages and perhaps a supportive garment for a week or so. Your healthcare provider will give you pain relief and antibiotics if required.

You should be able to pee normally and comfortably throughout your recovery. However, you must avoid any strenuous exercise or physical activity for around 4 weeks after your surgery. This includes lifting heavy weights, running, or riding a bicycle. You may also be advised to avoid wearing anything that rubs against your scar as it heals. You should also wait the same amount of time before having sexual intercourse.

Failing to follow these recommendations may result in your prosthetic testicle shifting out of position or being expelled by your body, infection, or bleeding around your scar.

After 4 weeks you should be able to remove all bandages, support garments, and live a normal life.

Meet the Team: Ian Arnison-Phillips

Welcome to the third post in our blog series – meet the team! Gain an insight into the lives of the people who run, support or volunteer for Baggy Trousers UK.

In this edition we meet one of our trustees – Ian Arnison-Phillips.

1) What does your role involve for BTUK?

I have been a trustee for almost a year now I think, and my main role is to create and manage our content output. Soon I will be getting more ‘hands on’ involved with our peer support groups with our upcoming writing workshop – more details to come!

2) Where were you born and where are you from now?

Manchester born and bred, currently living in Radcliffe. I’ve spent 4 years in Newcastle and 3 years in Leeds before now though.

3) What do you do for a job away from the charity?

Director of a content services company, author and poet.

4) How do you take your tea or coffee?

I don’t. Give me Vimto anytime though!

5) Do you have experience of testicular cancer, either first hand or second hand?

First hand – diagnosed April 2021. Stage 1, operation with no chemotherapy required. Sounds daft, but I’m one of the lucky ones in that respect. I noticed the lump early enough and had it checked out straight away, so the cancer didn’t spread. I want to encourage others to do the same.

6) How often do you check your nuts?

Daily.

7) What did you want to grow up to be when you were a kid?

A DJ – or Liam Gallagher haha

8) What was the last book you read and the last film you watched?

Book: It’s What He Would’ve Wanted – Sean Hughes

Film: One Hour Photo

9) If you could swap places with anyone for the day, who would it be and why?

Charlie Brooker just to access his mind for 24 hours.

10) What is your favourite BTUK blog?

This one – obviously!

11) What is your favourite genres of music?

House or 1990s/2010s indie rock and roll.

12) What’s the best place you have ever been to?

Maine Road or Bali – both very similar.

13) What do you hope to achieve with BTUK?

To get more men to talk about their feelings, to release any stigma around testicular cancer, and raise awareness around the importance of regularly self-checking. I want to normalise the subject, so men aren’t embarrassed to talk about it or get checked out if they have symptoms.

14) Tell us something not many people would know about you!

I documented my journey through my testicular cancer experience to provide a source of information, reassurance and a real life story for other men who may also be on their own journey through it. Check it out – www.droptheball.uk.

Want to be part of a team that makes a real difference?

Here at Baggy Trousers UK we are always looking for new ways to raise awareness and offer support. This includes welcoming volunteers and expanding on the team we already have. Over the coming weeks we will release a few more blogs in this series, revealing the names and faces behind our charity, and what they do for us.

If you are interested in becoming a trustee for BTUK then we are more than happy to have that conversation. What we do has a real impact on people’s lives, helping those impacted by testicular cancer and going through treatment. It is extremely rewarding and an incredibly important role to raise awareness, release the stigma, and save lives.

For more information contact us using our contact form, or get hold of us on FacebookInstagram, or X (Twitter).

Signs and Symptoms of Testicular Cancer

A standard human testicle is about the size of a walnut. You may think you’re packing a coconut, but the reality is men are all pretty much the same size on average. The most obvious sign that you may have a tumorous testicle is if this changes.

“When I first called my GP for an appointment to check my right testicle, it was about the size of a table tennis ball.” – Ian Arnison-Phillips (BTUK Trustee).

This is why it is important to regularly check your nuts and make sure everything is as it should be. Luckily for our Ian, he saw a doctor as soon as he noticed something odd. He therefore caught it early enough for it to remain a Stage 1 tumour – meaning it did not spread. Had he left it any longer, the cancer could have spread, and he probably would have needed more extensive treatment, such as chemotherapy.

Size really does matter in this case

The old saying goes, it’s not the size that matters it’s what you do with it. Well in this case it is both. Size does certainly matter for your testicles in that if they become enlarged or change shape in any way, you should get it checked out as soon as you can. It also matters what you do with them, as you should ideally be checking them out at least once a week.

How to check your nuts

  1. Take a warm shower or bath so your skin is relaxed.
  2. Examine one testicle at a time by taking the testicle between your thumb and first two fingers and roll with consistent gentle pressure.
  3. Feel for any lumps or changes in shape, size or consistency.
  4. Make sure to also check the epididymis towards the back of the testicle.
  5. If you notice a change or you feel a lump, don’t panic, but do get checked out.

Most lumps are not cancerous, but if you do notice anything unusual or anything concerning you should visit your doctor as soon as you can, to be on the safe side.

Other signs and symptoms of testicular cancer

There are other less common signs of testicular cancer, which may include:

  • A dull ache or pain in the abdomen, groin or scrotum
  • A heavy feeling in the scrotum
  • A sudden collection of fluid in the scrotum
  • Back pain

These can be signs or symptoms of a number of different things, not necessarily cancer. Still though, if you have any of these symptoms and they persist, you should go and get checked out!

Risk factors and causes

The exact causes of testicular cancer are still unknown. However, based on statistics from previous patients, there are a number of factors that can increase your risk of developing testicular cancer.

Risk factors include:

  • Caucasian men: Higher risk than other ethnic groups
  • Taller men: Strangely enough, taller men are more likely to get it than smaller men
  • Twins: The risk is even more so if you are an identical twin
  • Family history: If any men in your family have had testicular cancer in the past
  • Undescended testicle: If you are born with this condition you are more likely to experience testicular cancer

Having one or more risk factors doesn’t mean that you will certainly have testicular cancer. The disease is rare, even if you have some of these risk factors.

Do your part! Check your nuts!

If you check your balls frequently and see a doctor if you do find something unusual, then you have done all you can. Statistics suggest you will be absolutely fine, even if you do find something. These statistics cannot help you if you do not help yourself though!

Check regularly! Do not put off calling the doctor if you find a lump! You could potentially save your life!

Meet the Team: Rob Roughley

Welcome to the second post in our blog series – meet the team! It does exactly what it says on the tin! Gain an insight into the lives of the people who run, support or volunteer for Baggy Trousers UK.

In this edition we meet one of our board members and chair – Robert Roughley.

1) What does your role involve for BTUK?

I am the chair of trustees & a trustee. I undertake testicular cancer and mental health awareness talks on behalf of the charity, chair monthly board meetings and currently fundraising by running 2400km in 2024 to raise awareness and funds for the charity.

2) Where were you born and where are you from now?

I was born in Wallasey, I now live in Bramhall.

3) What do you do for a job away from the charity?

Director for a Construction Company.

4) How do you take your tea or coffee?

Strong with a drop of oat milk.

5) Do you have experience of testicular cancer, either first hand or second hand?

First hand experience. Diagnosed on my birthday 23rd Dec 2020. Stage 1 – 1cm tumour. Had operation and 1 shot of chemotherapy. Regular appointments every 6 months.

6) How often do you check your nuts?

Weekly.

7) What did you want to grow up to be when you were a kid?

Professional rugby player or businessman.

8) What was the last book you read and the last film you watched?

Book – The Art of Resilience.

Film – The Gentlemen & also the series.

9) If you could swap places with anyone for the day, who would it be and why?

Jonny Wilkinson 2003 Rugby World Cup – that drop goal!

10) What is your favourite BTUK blog?

The Nuts and Bolts of Prosthetic Testicles (we’re working on this one now – will be good one when released!).

11) What is your favourite genres of music?

Dance / Trance

12) What’s the best place you have ever been to?

Bali – amazing place, the people, culture.

13) What do you hope to achieve with BTUK?

Raise awareness about testicular cancer, encourage men to open-up and talk about their feelings, guide people to how to check and the importance of checking, and support people going through testicular cancer.

14) Tell us something not many people would know about you!

I have never been on a rollercoaster.

Want to be part of a team that makes a real difference?

Here at Baggy Trousers UK we are always looking for new ways to raise awareness and offer support. This includes welcoming volunteers and expanding on the team we already have. Over the coming weeks we will release a few more blogs in this series, revealing the names and faces behind our charity, and what they do for us.

If you are interested in becoming a trustee for BTUK then we are more than happy to have that conversation. What we do has a real impact on people’s lives, helping those impacted by testicular cancer and going through treatment. It is extremely rewarding and an incredibly important role to raise awareness, release the stigma, and save lives.

For more information contact us using our contact form, or get hold of us on FacebookInstagram, or X (Twitter).

London Marathon: Crazy Facts and Figures

Congratulations to all those that completed the London Marathon this weekend – more than 53,000 of you finished the marathon on Sunday! A new record! Over £67 million has been raised so far – the biggest amount ever seen for an annual one-day fundraising event. A new world record!

Below we’ve listed some more crazy facts and figures relating to the London Marathon from previous years – check them out!

Rob the Record Breaker

Before we get to that though, we wanted to give a shout out to our very own Robert Roughley, who is trying to beat a record of his own and run 2400km! That’s over 50 times the length of the London Marathon, and he has just 365 days to do it.

The mission is to raise awareness and support those impacted by testicular cancer. Every year, over 2400 men in the UK are diagnosed with testicular cancer. Rob is running 1km for every man diagnosed each year. He has already covered over 690km and would really appreciate your support along the way. All fundraising will go directly to Baggy Trousers UK, who supported Rob through his testicular cancer journey.

Come on Rob! You got this!

London Marathon Facts and Figures

Where it all started

The first ever London Marathon was started by Chris Brasher (former Olympic champion) and John Disley (former athlete) on 29 March 1981. At that time 7741 people entered the race, with 6255 finishers. Nowhere near the numbers we see today, but still quite impressive considering it was the first one.

Over one billion raised

Since that first marathon, over one billion pounds has been raised for charities across the world. This is why the London Marathon is known as the largest annual fundraising event on the planet.

Record breaking every year

A total of 45 Guinness World Records were broken at the 2023 London Marathon. The results for this year still haven’t been fully collected or published yet, but we all expect more to be broken again in 2024. In fact, the event itself holds a Guiness World Record – for having the most Guinness World Records set in a single marathon!

Fastest marathon wearing wellington boots

One of those records in-particular is whackier than most! Becky Lafford holds the Guinness World Record for the fastest female to run marathon wearing wellington boots. Her time came in at 3:59:57. We’re just impressed she even finished the course – and can only imagine the potential blisters! Ouch!

Oldest participant is 91

At 90 years’ of age in last year’s event, David Picksley proved to the world that age is just a number. Well this year he’s only gone and done it again! At 91, David is a true testament to the meaning of the event, and perhaps proof that the most important number is the one you wear on your chest. Well done David!

Ever Presents

The ‘Ever Presents’ are exactly as they say they are. This is the name of a small group of runners who have participated in every London Marathon since it began back in 1981. There are now less than 10, all of whom entered this year’s event – of course!

270 birthday celebrations

A total of 270 runners celebrated their birthday on Marathon Day! Whether it felt like a celebration at the time or not is another thing, but I bet the drink in the pub afterwards was unbeatable. Happy birthday and congratulations to those 270 (slightly mad) people!

Middle-aged runners dominate

Almost 40,000 people that signed up to this year’s event belong to the 30-49 age group. This is over 50% of the total number of people (65,000) that registered in 2024. More surprisingly, there were more people aged 70-79 registered (509) than there were 18-19 year olds (366). The oldies showing the youngsters how it’s done once again!

Fundraising is easy and a lot of fun

Fundraising events like the London Marathon are extremely important for raising awareness and support for charities across the world, just like Baggy Trousers UK.

We host and organise our own fundraiser events across the year, to help and support those suffering from Testicular Cancer. If you would like to get involved, you’ll be making someone’s journey through testicular cancer more comfortable and supported, as well as funding our awareness campaigns.

This means providing people with the information they need to get an earlier diagnosis, and potentially saving lives. In return, you’ll get that feel-good factor from achieving your goals and making a real difference. We like to do things that are fun, sociable, and creative – based around the activities you’re enthusiastic about.

If you need any further help, advice or just someone to bounce your ideas off, we would love to hear from you! Contact us at info@baggytrousersuk.org.

Resources:

Photo by Miguel A Amutio on Unsplash.

https://www.reuters.com/sports/athletics/london-marathon-sets-world-record-with-more-than-53000-finishing-2024-04-22/

https://www.tcslondonmarathon.com/

https://www.guinnessworldrecords.com/

Baggy Trousers UK founder Jack Broadley

Meet the Team: Jack Broadley

Welcome to the first edition of our new blog series – meet the team! It does exactly what it says on the tin! Gain an insight into the lives of the people who run, support or volunteer for Baggy Trousers UK.

We start the series with our founder Jack Broadley.

1) What does your role involve for Baggy Trousers UK?

I started at Baggy Trousers UK on the 14 August 2014, day one of it being a charity, from idea on a piece of paper that included the goals and aspirations to raise awareness of the battle I’d just been through to hopefully save lives and offer a listening ear to those diagnosed. Since then, I’ve done every role you could think of at Baggy Trousers UK, these days I’m a trustee, I focus on our support services and day to day running of the charity, no two days are the same.

2) Where were you born and where are you from now?

I was born in Ashton-under-Lyne, I spent a short time living in sunny Scotland before heading back to reside in Tameside.

3) What do you do for a job away from the charity?

Since setting up Baggy Trousers UK, I joined an incredible digital agency called Reason Digital that works with lots of pro-social organisations supporting them with their digital solutions providing a better service and support to people they provide services to. I also trained to be an accountant and set up an accounting practice which I’m currently building, and I also work with another charity that raises awareness of the signs and symptoms of cancer to teenagers and those in their twenties.

4) How do you take your tea or coffee?

Has to be Yorkshire Tea with 2 sugars and a drop of milk, tea bag has to sit for a little while to brew.

5) Have you had experience of testicular cancer, either first or second hand?

I was diagnosed with stage 2 non-seminoma mature teratoma (a bit of a mouthful). Basically an aggressive type of testicular cancer that spread to my abdominal lymph nodes, this required surgery to remove the testicle and a gruelling 9 weeks of chemotherapy treatment.

6) How often do you check yourself?

Before being diagnosed with testicular cancer I never checked and had no idea what I would have been looking for, I check my remaining nut at least once a month.

7) What did you want to be when you were a kid?

I wanted to be a race car driver.

8) What was the last book you read and the last film you watched?

The last book I read was The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho and the last film I watched was The Beekeeper with Jason Statham, another one of his incredible films.

9) If you could swap places with anyone for the day, who would it be and why?

I would probably swap places with an F1 driver to understand what it feels like to be behind the wheel of an F1 car.

10) What is your favourite BTUK blog?

All the blogs we create are incredible (I’m slightly biased), the one that has a special place in my heart is ‘Music for Merrick’. Myself and Jess (our treasurer) travelled down to a fundraiser organised by an amazing family in aid of the work we do, we had the chance to meet Jamie who despite having chemotherapy the same day as the fundraiser, was a ray of sunshine and such a kind and gentle man. The whole team and I here at Baggy Trousers UK were saddened to hear that Jamie passed away a few months after the fundraiser. That blog is now a tribute to Jamie and a piece of his legacy which will remain on the website forever.

11) What is your favourite genre of music?

I enjoy all types of music, but my favourite is probably house music.

12) What’s the best place you have ever been to?

The best place I’ve ever been to has to be Scotland, I enjoy walking in the mountains and thanks to my dad started doing the Munro’s in 2017. I hope to one day follow in his footsteps and climb all 282 of them.

13) What do you hope to achieve with BTUK?

I hope to continue providing support to those impacted by testicular cancer and saving lives for as long as I’m alive. Having somebody to talk to that has been through a similar experience was vital for me when I was going through treatment which is why we have peer support volunteers and people kindly raising awareness.

14) Tell us something not many people would know about you!

I delivered a talk at a teenage and young person’s cancer event about people you meet during your cancer journey who unfortunately pass away. It’s by far the hardest talk I’ve delivered but the response and empathy I received from the hundreds of young people diagnosed with cancer in the audience brought me to tears.

Fancy becoming part of a team that makes a real difference?

Here at Baggy Trousers UK we are always looking for new ways to raise awareness and offer support. This includes welcoming volunteers and expanding on the team we already have. Over the coming weeks we will release a few more blogs in this series, revealing the names and faces behind our charity, and what they do for us.

If you are interested in becoming a trustee for BTUK then we are more than happy to have that conversation. What we do has a real impact on people’s lives, helping those impacted by testicular cancer and going through treatment. It is extremely rewarding and an incredibly important role to raise awareness, release the stigma, and save lives.

For more information contact us using our contact form, or get hold of us on Facebook, Instagram, or X (Twitter).

No Frills Guide on How to Check Your Nuts

Testicular cancer awareness month is in full swing and with it comes our no frills guide on how to check your nuts! It’s extremely important that you regularly examine your testicles as it may one day just save your life. It’s normal for one of your boys to be bigger or hang lower than the other, so this is definitely nothing to worry about.

For anything else that may concern you, or to make sure you’re always on the safe side, follow this simple step by step guide on how to check your nuts!

Take a shower

It’s not mandatory that you have to clean your balls before you check them, but it does help to relax them beforehand. A warm shower will relax your skin and allow for a closer or better examination than if you were to do it after work or the gym, for example. If you get into a routine of always checking after you have a shower, it will become second nature and as frequent as it should be to be on the safe side.

Use your thumb and first two fingers

You want to examine one testicle at a time. Take each one between your thumb and your first two fingers. Roll them around the testicle, applying a consistent gentle pressure, to feel for any lumps or changes in size, shape or consistency. Take your time and don’t worry if it feels a little tender, this is normal. You should only be concerned if there is real pain when you touch them.

Get familiar with your epididymis

The often forgotten about epididymis is just as important to check as your testicles. This is the tube like part of the scrotum located behind the testicles. It should feel rope like and tender under pressure, this is absolutely normal. Again, feel for any lumps or changes in size or shape.

Don’t panic if you notice something strange

The vast majority of lumps, bumps or changes in shape or size found in the testicles are usually not cancerous. Many instances of this end up being cists or fatty build-ups that can be easily remedied. So don’t panic if you do find something, it may end up being nothing to worry about at all.

Get it looked at straight away

However, either way, it is extremely important that you get it checked out as soon as you can. Visit your GP and they will advise you on the next steps, which may or may not include having an ultrasound scan. If caught early enough testicular cancer is highly curable, with a 95% survival rate. But again it does depend how early you detect it.

Not just in testicular cancer awareness month!

So gentlemen, please, in the month of April start to develop the habit of repeating these steps as often as you can. Then make it a frequent thing moving forward for the rest of your life – you never know – it may one day save it!

5 Things You May Not Know About Testicular Cancer

April is testicular cancer awareness month. Throughout the next 30 days, charities like Baggy Trousers UK will be doing more than ever to raise awareness and funds to help support those experiencing testicular cancer. Sadly, over 2400 people in the UK are diagnosed with testicular cancer every year. If detected early though, the chances of a full recovery are extremely high.

This is why raising awareness and reducing any embarrassment around the subject is vital, not only throughout April, but all year round too. To help improve understanding and encourage more people to check their balls, we’ve come up with 5 things you may not have heard about testicular cancer.

1. It is 95% curable if detected early

The lifetime risk of dying from testicular cancer is around 1 in 5000, if detected early. Okay, so it might be a bit much to start right off the bat with death, but this is perhaps the most important fact of them all. The earlier you detect it, the easier your recovery will be. It is as simple as that. Treatment is so effective that the chances of a full recovery are excellent – but again – only if you check your balls often enough to find it.

Therefore, fellas, fondling your balls on a regular basis is extremely important. And let’s be honest, a lot of fun too, so why not?

  1. Sit back and relax after a warm shower (steady now, don’t get too excited) as your skin will be at its most relaxed.
  2. Take your time, and check one at a time.
  3. Take one testicle between your first two fingers and your thumb and roll them around with gentle pressure.
  4. Check for any lumps or changes in shape, size, colour or consistency.
  5. Do the same for your epididymis (your spermatic chord / the tube-like thing at the back of the testicle).

It’s normal for the epididymis to feel tender under gentle pressure. Also, don’t panic if you do notice a lump or anything concerning, most of the time it is not cancer. However, it is important that you visit your doctor as soon as you can to have it checked out.

More information on how to check your nuts.

2. One of the most common cancers for young men

Overall, testicular cancer is relatively rare, making up just 1% of all cancers in men. However, it is the most common type to occur in men between the ages of 15 and 49. Although men past their 50s can and are still affected by testicular cancer, the chances of you getting it are a lot higher in your twenties and thirties.

3. Exact causes are still unknown

Despite research, the exact causes of testicular cancer are still largely unknown. For example, we know that smoking severely increasing chances of lung cancer, but there is no equivalent for testicular cancer. However, based on statistics from previous patients, there are a number of factors that can increase your risk of developing it.

Rather curiously, Caucasian men have a higher risk of getting testicular cancer than men from other ethnic groups, and so do taller men. Twins also have an increased risk of testicular cancer, especially if they are identical. Other factors include a family history of testicular cancer, or if you are born with an undescended testicle.

4. Testicles are removed through the abdomen

If you do find a lump that is concerning, your GP may advise you to have an ultrasound scan and some blood tests. You may also see a urologist, which is a specialist that diagnoses and treats disorders of the bladder, kidneys, prostate, ureters and male reproductive organs.

If they determine from your scans and blood test results that your testicle may have a cancerous tumour, it will need to be removed to be tested. The operation is called an orchidectomy.

What a lot of people don’t know is that in most cases this is done via the lower abdomen. Your scrotum (ballbag) is left untouched. The operation will result in a scar on one side of your lower abdomen, much similar to those who have had their appendix out.

5. You can have a ball job!

Breast augmentations (boob jobs) have been around since the 60s, but did you know you can have a ball job too? Before an orchidectomy, a testicular cancer patient is offered the choice of having a prosthetic replacement. The vast majority of young men will take the prosthetic option, but older men are more likely to turn it down and live with one testicle.

These are made of silicone, much similar to the material used in any other augmentation procedure, and come in a range of different sizes. They feel slightly firmer to the touch, but visually from the outside no different at all. Just don’t expect to be on page 3 with them anytime soon.

References

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/testicular-cancer/

https://www.cuh.nhs.uk/patient-information/insertion-of-an-artificial-testicle/

I noticed a small lump on my right testicle

Jack Hinton was just 24-years-old when he was diagnosed with testicular cancer in 2019. The musical theatre actor who lives in London, shares his story about discovering a lump in his testicle, and the subsequent surgery. Jack, who’s now 26, sought support from Baggy Trousers UK following his diagnosis, and is returning the favour by hosting an online fundraising concert…

Jack said: ‘At first, I noticed a small lump on my right testicle and went to my nearest doctor to get it checked. I was assured by the doctor that it was nothing to worry about and all would be fine. The following week I then flew to Germany to start rehearsals for my next job. Two months later, I then realised that what was once a small lump had grown into the size of a large tennis ball. This was ultimately when I knew that something was not right and so, I went straight to a hospital in Germany where I was diagnosed with testicular cancer.

‘Four days after my diagnosis, I underwent surgery to remove the tumour. The staff at the hospital warned me that the tumour was an aggressive one, so they tried to get me into the theatre for surgery as soon as they could. I went in for my surgery and then had to stay in the hospital for five days. After this, I left the hospital to get back to resuming rehearsals but for the next eight weeks, had to come back to the hospital once a week for blood tests to ensure that I was keeping on the mend.

‘I am so pleased and relieved that my prognosis is now all clear and I aim to get a check-up every six months. Given that I was in Germany throughout my experience, I wasn’t aware of any UK based charities at the time. Baggy Trousers UK was one of the charities I researched when I returned home, and as soon as I got in direct contact with Jack [the founder], and we spoke about our experiences, I knew I picked the right charity. Seeing the support the charity offers is wonderful. When the idea came to me to host a show; I knew I wanted to associate it with a charity.

‘I hosted a concert on Thursday 3rd December 2020, at a theatre in London. I used my platform in this concert to share all about my story and experience, fighting testicular cancer. Throughout the show, I sang some songs, all of which mean a lot to me and have relevance to my story.

‘This concert was also professionally filmed and streamed online for £5 per ticket to raise funds in aid of Baggy Trousers UK.

‘Throughout my recovery period post-surgery, I felt alone and didn’t know how to be feeling or what the next steps to take were. I wanted to speak about this in my concert and with hope, resonate with others who may have felt like this also. It’s such an impactful event in one’s life, experiencing cancer and especially for men who are still carved out in today’s society to just ‘get on with it’ etc.; I feel I now have a duty from experience that I can share with others and with hope, help others to not feel so alone. To show my efforts in wanting to do this, I wanted to donate the money I raised through ticket sales and give it to an amazing charity raising awareness and support for others fighting the same battle.

‘To other men, my age, older and younger, I would say – CHECK YOUR NUTS! I do it once a week. Of course, the first couple of times it may be “scary” as one may not want to have to think about what they may find down there. However, it’s so worth it and nowhere near as scary as it being too late!

‘The body has an indescribable way of telling you that something’s wrong. Even after my first appointment with the doctor who assured me everything was ‘okay’, I knew in my heart of heart’s everything wasn’t. You can never be too careful and nothing is more important than your health and happiness.’

You can find Jack on Instagram @JACKHINTON__ (that’s a double underscore) Or on Twitter: @JACKHINTON_ (single underscore)

We need your support

Over the past five years we have reached over 3 million people online, delivered awareness talks to over 15,000 young adults and engaged with over 50 males directly affected by testicular cancer.

The generosity of our supporters has enabled us to make a real difference in our mission to offer emotional, financial and practical support to those directly affected by testicular cancer. Together ensuring that those affected receive the best possible support after a cancer diagnosis and throughout recovery.

As a small charity, we very much rely on supporter donations to deliver our charitable aims. The financial climate for charities like Baggy Trousers UK is particularly hard at the moment and our fundraising needs to be balanced with our focus on making an impact delivering life-saving educational talks and providing support to people directly affected by testicular cancer.

We need your help. I am writing this blog today to ask if you would be willing to offer your support in the form of a vital donation?

£25 could pay for our online support forum to run for one week, the forum gives people access to peer support online 24 hours a day.

£50 could pay for 1,000 awareness leaflets, designed to educate young adults on how to check themselves for the signs and symptoms of testicular cancer.

£100 could pay for the delivery of an awareness talk to a school or college helping young adults to learn all about testicular cancer and become confident in their own wellbeing.

Donations can be made:

Online via our website, www.baggytrousersuk.org/donate.

A regular donation through our monthly giving option via our website.

By cheque, please make cheques payable to Baggy Trousers UK and post to Richmond House, Hill Street, Ashton-under-Lyne, Lancashire, OL7 0PZ.

Any support you can offer will allow us to continue our life-saving work with young men.

Thank you in advance,

Yours sincerely,

Jack Broadley

Founder & CEO of Baggy Trousers UK